In the Know | eBooks

Load Bank Testing | Part 3 | Choosing the Right Load Bank

During testing with a resistive only load bank, a system that is sensitive to transient voltage dips would not necessarily provide an indication of a power supply or system condition that would lead to a potential problem during operation.

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Load Bank Testing | Part 2 | Key Reason for Load Testing

The key reason for load testing is that many generator sets seldom run under full load conditions after the manufacturer’s factory testing. Though tested in compliance with the regulatory requirements that permit use of actual loads, over time, this practice can lead to conditions that affect performance and reliability. Modern diesel generator sets designed to meet the stringent EPA Tier Level emission standards are designed to be operated at loads higher than 50% for optimum life and performance.

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Load Bank Testing | Part 1 | Standards of Certification

In examining the key differences between resistive and resistive/ reactive load testing, and why the latter is necessary, it is important to focus on addressing a facility’s emergency power generation system as a whole by testing the entire system to identify system-wide weaknesses at the time of commissioning and at periodic test intervals to be in compliance with regulatory agencies.

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Maintaining a Healthy Generator Engine at Your Facility | Part 2

The recommended procedure to follow for the load bank test would be to:

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Maintaining a Healthy Generator Engine at Your Facility | Part 1

All diesel powered generators when exercised should be loaded to at least 60 - 70% of their standby nameplate rating at least once a month in order to be a reliable sources of power. Exercising generators at less than 50% will ultimately result in “wet stacking” or “slobbering”. In order for a diesel engine to operate at peak efficiency it must be able to provide fuel and air in the proper ratio and at a high enough engine temperature for the engine to completely burn all of the fuel.

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The Case for Reactive Load Bank Testing for Stationary Engines | Part 3

A reactive load bank test of a facility’s power generation system can actually simulate the system’s response to a changing load pattern:

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The Case for Reactive Load Bank Testing for Stationary Engines | Part 2

Facilities managers and business owners are occasionally hesitant to conduct a test of their facility’s emergency power generation systems (as opposed to just testing their system’s engine) because this sort of comprehensive testing is substantially more involved (and expensive) than a simple test of the engine. Power systems must be interrupted. A service provider must complete arduous and complex attachments to various points in the facility’s power system to test it, both as a collection of several discrete units and as a whole.

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The Case for Reactive Load Bank Testing for Stationary Engines | Part 1

For years, responsible facilities managers have been aware that they need backup electric power generation equipment at their businesses as “insurance” against threats such as lost time and equipment damage due to utility power interruptions.

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